SYLLABUS

Introduction to Ethics

PHI 2600

Reference #:  449305

Table of Contents


Faculty Contact Information

  • Faculty Name: Tonietta A. Walters
  • Office Phone: 305-299-0100
  • Email: twalters@broward.edu (All email communication should be through D2L. Use this only if you have an emergency and are unable to access D2L email.)
  • Virtual Office Hours: Any Weekday by appointment

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the nature of ethics, ethical thinking, major intellectual movements in the history of ethics, and specific problems in ethics. The relationship between ethics and culture will also be examined. For more information, please see BC College course outline)


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General Course Outcomes

  • The students should be able to identify and discuss elements antecedent to the study of ethics.
    Upon successful completion of this unit, the students should be able to:
  • Distinguish ethics from other disciplines such as sociology and religion.
  • Discuss problems of justification in ethics.
  • The students should be able to identify and discuss the major ethical theories.
    Upon successful completion of this unit, the students should be able to reflectively and creatively discuss, differentiate, and define various ethical concepts and ethical theories in the history of philosophy including, but not limited to the following:
  • Virtue ethical theories e.g., Plato and Aristotle.
  • Consequentialist theories.
  • Ethical egoism.
  • Utilitarianism.
  • Various non-consequentialist ethical theories, e.g., Kant and Ross.
  • Differentiate theories of meta-ethics, e.g., naturalism and non-naturalism.
  • Divine-command theory
  • The students should be familiar with the problems of applying ethical theory to various problems.
    Upon successful completion of this unit, the students should be able to:
  • Discuss the following:
  • Abortion
  • Capital punishment
  • Euthanasia
  • Suicide
  • Other ethical problems
  • Examine the importance of ethical behavior for the self and society.
  • The students should understand the application of ethical theories to real-world experiences.

Course Prerequisites

To maximize your chances for success in this course, make sure that you meet the following course prerequisites:

  • Course Academic Prerequisites and Corequisites: None.
  • Computer Knowledge and Skills Required:
    • Students in this course should be familiar with the following computer skills.
      • File Management - You should be familiar with finding and saving files on your computer.
      • The Internet - You should be familiar with connecting to the Internet through an Internet Service Provider or Network Connection.
      • Web Browser Software - You should be familiar with using web browser software to navigate the Internet and locate information.
      • Email - You should be familiar with sending and receiving email messages.
      • Discussions - You should be familiar with posting and reading discussion messages in a threaded format.
      • Attachments - You should be familiar with sending email messages with attached files.
      • Word Processing - You should be familiar with creating, editing, saving, and printing documents using Microsoft Word.
  • Other Requirements:
    • You'll need a BC email address to access the online portion of this course.
    • Obtain a County Library Card or University/College Library Card. You will need either a County Library Card which you may obtain at either North Campus or South Campus Library or a University/College Library Card from the Central Campus Library. These cards will allow you to use select library databases. (optional)

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Course Hardware & Software Requirements

To complete the online segments of this course, you must have access to computer hardware and software that meets or exceeds BC's minimum hardware and software standards for e-learning courses. It is strongly recommended that you check your computer to verify that its hardware and software configuration meets or exceeds the BC standard.

    • Attention AOL Users: Students using AOL should pay particular attention to the section addressing issues related to AOL. To avoid AOL dropping your connection, set up a private chat room to suspend AOL's idle timer. See AOL's help function for more details.
    • Attention Windows XP Users: Users who have upgraded to Windows XP from Windows 95,98,ME,NT,2000 do not need to download any additional files. Windows XP does not include the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). The JVM is used by some tools within D2L. Students with new machines or who perform a clean installation of Windows XP will automatically be offered the choice to perform a one-time download of the virtual machine the first time you try to access any tool within D2L that uses Java.You must download the entire file before continuing to use D2L.
  • Technical and Access Problems
    • If you attempt to use hardware or software that does not meet the BC standard, it is possible that you will encounter technical difficulties when accessing your online course that could interfere with your ability to view content or complete assignments.
      • If you encounter difficulties accessing content in D2L or in logging in, please contact the 24/7 helpdesk.
    • To avoid unforeseen technical complications that can occur, even when you think everything is working well, it is strongly recommended that you complete and submit your assignments well ahead of schedule.
    • If you do not have access to a computer that meets or exceeds BC's minimum hardware and software standards, you can use an "open lab" computer at any BC Learning Resource Center. Get current check your campus for the hours of operation of the LRC Open Computer Lab at http://www.broward.edu/libraries/index.jsp Please remember that the computer lab attendants are there to ensure that the computer equipment is working properly, not to help you with your assignments. Direct all questions regarding this course to your instructor.
      • Lack of access to a computer that meets BC's hardware and software standards or difficulty connecting to the Internet are not a valid excuse for failure to complete the online portion of course requirements on time.
  • Additional Software Required for this Course (optional)
    • Any word processing documents that you may be required to submit for this course must be submitted in Microsoft Word format. (Not Microsoft Works, text, not ascii, not PDF, etc.) If you do not have proper software on your computer, you can use the Microsoft Word program on any of the "open lab" computers at any BC Learning Resource Center.
      • Only word processing documents in Microsoft Word format will be accepted. Please virus check documents before sending them. Panda Software offers a free online virus check.

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Required Course Materials

Required and Optimal course materials are described below:

  • Texts
    • Main Textbook - Boss, Judith: Ethics for Life: A Text with Readings. 4th Ed., McGraw-Hill, Boston, 2008 (ISBN 978-0-07-338664-5). Extra material will be provided by the instructor as needed.
    • Extra Reading - Rachels, James: The Elements of Moral Philosophy. 5th Edition by Stuart Rachels. McGraw-Hill, Boston, 2007 (ISBN 978-0-07-312547-3). This book should be read by those students who might need a different approach to the information found in the course main textbook. The students are not required to buy this book and no assignment will be required from it.

Methods of Instruction

This is a 3 credit hour course. Normally, a three credit hour course would meet two or three times each week (during a 16 week term) for a total of 3 hours per week or 48 hours per term. In this course, we will not meet in class, but instead of class time you will engage in structured out of class or online activities. See "Course Schedule and Assignments" section below for a detailed description of learning activities for out of class or online assignments. Students are responsible for regularly reviewing the course schedule and completing all required in and out of class assignments.

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Course Participation and Attendance Policy

Regular, active, and meaningful participation in both on campus class meetings and online learning activities is a critically important component of this course and is essential to your success. It is recommended that you check into the course site several times during the online week. Frequency and quality of participation may effect your grade.

  • Participation:
    • Active participation is expected of all students in this course.
    • Check your e-mail and course discussions regularly. Ask questions.
    • Post and respond to messages.
  • BC Attendance Policy: Please familiarize yourself with BC's Attendance Policy:

It is very important for you to actively participate in this online class. If you stop participating in class discussions, submitting assignments or fail to take quizzes or tests prior to the withdrawal date, you will be administratively withdrawn from class and receive a W or, if it is your third attempt, an F.

If you stop participating after the withdrawal date, you will receive a WF that will then be computed as an F in your GPA. To avoid this situation, you should remain an active learner in this class and always communicate extenuating circumstances to me. Ongoing communication with the instructor is critical to your course success. I will use completion of tests, assignments, and other class activities as indicators of your participation in order to satisfy this reporting requirement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Course Schedule and Assignments

Read and refer to this document regularly. It will tell you what assignments you should read and when, and how and when you will be assessed.

Mandatory Course Orientation:  Students can only continue to the other course’s modules after completing this Course Orientation module.

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

Online Orientation
and
Syllabus Review

  • Course web page and Syllabus
  • Access the course home page in D2L
  • Read course orientation in "Course Info/Start Here"
  • Complete orientation assignment and practice exam
  • Explore course icons
  • Post student introduction
  • Read syllabus
  • Send private e-mail to instructor indicating that syllabus has been read, understood and agreed with
  • Being able to log in to the course web page
  • Being able to recognize course icons and navigate through them
  • Being able to post a message in the "Discussion" area
  • Being able to send and receive private e-mails from D2L
  • Being able to complete a small assessment
  • Being able to respond a few questions about the syllabus

In the course homepage, go to the "Orientation Module," then:

  • Go to "Syllabus Orientation Quiz" and complete a mandatory quiz about D2L functionality and the syllabus.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Mail" and send a private e-mail to instructor indicating that syllabus has been read, understood and agreed with.
    Points: 1.0
  • Go to "Introduction" and post a brief introduction about yourself, indicating who you are, your major, and when you expect to graduate from BC.
    Points: 1.0

Total of points: 4.0

 

Weeks 1 & 2: Chapters 1-2

 

 

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

Chapter 1:

 

Ethics: General Overview

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 1 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 1 with special attention to the following topics:
    - What is ethics?
    - Normative and theoretical ethics
    - Metaphysics and human nature
    - Epistemology and moral knowledge
    - Philosophy and the search for wisdom
  • Read the passage "Allegory of the Cave," on page 16
  • Read the passage "Emotivism," on page 29
  • To know the importance of ethics in our everyday lives
  • To know the two subdivisions in moral philosophy: normative ethics and metaethics
  • To know the different types of ethical theories
  • To understand the concept of "theory" and the limitations of theory
  • To know the distinction between ethical relativism and universalist moral theories
  • To understand the concepts of personhood and moral community

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 1," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch1" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 1.
    Points: 2.0
  • After doing a self-examination of your moral thinking, go to "Moral Inconsistencies" and submit a brief comment about the inconsistencies found in your moral thinking. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

Total of points: 4.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 2:

 

Moral Reasoning

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 2 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 2 with special attention to the following topics:
    - Three levels of thinking
    - Moral analysis, praxis, and paradigm shifts
    - Overcoming resistance
    - The role of is and ought in ethics
    - Recognizing and constructing moral arguments
    - Avoiding logical fallacies
    - resolving moral dilemmas
  • Read the passage "The Relevance of the Noble Eightfold Path to Contemporary Society," on page 45
  • Read the passage "Can't We Make Moral Judgments?," on page 68
  • To know the three levels of thinking: experience, interpretation, and analysis
  • To understand the role of moral sensitivity and ontological shock in praxis
  • To understand the impact of our worldviews and pradigms on moral thinking
  • To recognize and break through patterns of resistance that prevent us from analyzing our worldviews
  • To know how to construct a moral argument
  • To recognize and avoid logical fallacies
  • To know how to solve moral dilemmas

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 2," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch2" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 2.
    Points: 2.0
  • After a brief research, go to "Moral Examples" and submit an example of either a moral argument, or an ethical informal fallacy, or a moral dilemma found in your own experience or from newspapers, magazines, or movies. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Review Exam 1": Take a 25-multiple- choice / true or false question exam covering the material studied in chapters 1 and 2 of Ethics for Life. Please, make sure you read the exam's instructions thoroughly before taking the exam.
    Points: 5.0

Total of points: 9.0

 

Remember: Exam 1 - Chapters 1 and 2
Please, make sure you read the exam's instructions thoroughly before taking the exam.

 

Weeks 3 & 4: Chapters 3-5

 

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 3:

 

Ethical Subjectivism: Morality as a Matter of Personal Opinion

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 3 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 3 with special attention to the following topics:
    - What is ethical subjectivism?
    - What ethical subjectivism is not
    - The roots of ethical subjectivism in J.-J. Rousseau
    - The criticism of Mary Wollstonecraft
    -The Kitty Genovese syndrome
    - Critique of ethical subjectivism
  • Read the passage "Student Relativ- ism," on page 80
  • Read the passage "Emile," on page 85
  • To understand the theory of ethical subjectivism
  • To understand the difference between ethical subjectivism and moral uncertainty, emotivism, and ethical skepticism
  • To recognize the roots of ethical subjectivism in Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Romantic Sentimentalism, and Mary Wollstonecraft's critique of Rousseau's theory
  • To understand the implications of ethical subjectivism for real-life moral behavior as occurred in the Kitty Genovese case
  • To know the weaknesses of ethical subjectivism that make it inadequate as moral theory

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 3," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch3" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 3.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Kitty Genovese" and submit an example of a moral situation depicting the "Kitty Genovese syndrome" found in your own experience or from newspapers, magazines, or movies. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Essay: Role of Ethics in My Life" and submit a 1-page essay about the role of ethics in your life. Essay should be based on the student’s thoughts about the importance of ethics in his/her life. See submission requirements in D2L.
    Points: 5.0

Total of points: 9.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 4:

 

Cultural Relativism: Morality as a Matter of Culture

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 4 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 4 with special attention to the following topics:
    - What is cultural relativism?
    - Difference between cultural and sociological relativism
    - Social Darwinian Ethics
    - Cultural relativism as a protest against Social Darwinism
    - Cultural relativism and the moral community
    - The Holocaust and disillusionment with cultural relativism
    - Critique of cultural relativism
  • Read the passage "Anthropology and the Abnormal," on page 114
  • Read the passage "The Muqaddimah," on page 128
  • To understand the theory of cultural relativism
  • To understand the difference between cultural relativism and tolerance of cultural diversity
  • To know the distinction between cultural relativism and sociological relativism and why moral disagreement does not necessarily imply cultural relativism
  • To know Herbert Spencer's social Darwianian ethics, and understand the effects of this theory on social policy and on moral theory
  • To understand how the rise in popularity of cultural relativism, came about as a protest by Ruth Benedict and other anthropologists against social Darwinian ethics
  • To understand the impact of cultural relativism in our definition of moral community and our treatment of people who are marginalized or outside the moral community
  • To understand how different philosophers, including Ibn Khaldun, address the question of whether some cultures are more moral than others
  • To understand why the Holocaust contributed to disillusionment with cultural relativism following World War II
  • To understand the real-life implications of accepting cultural relativism

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 4," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch4" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 4.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Moral Community" and submit an example of a moral situation depicting the marginalization of those not included in the Vietnam moral community found in your own experience or from newspapers, magazines, or movies. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

Total of points: 4.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 5:

 

Morality and Religion: Morality is a Matter of Religious Belief

 

 

 

Review of Chapters 1 Through 5 for the Midterm Exam

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 5 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 5 with special attention to the following topics:
    - Religion and morality
    - The Divine Command theory
    - Natural Law theory
    - Religion, Natural Law theory, and civil disobedience
    - Civil religion and cultural relativism
    - God and problem of evil
    - Does morality need religion?
  • Read the passage "In Defense of the Divine Command Conception," on page 152  
  • Read the passage "The Summa Theologica," on page 163

 

  • Review chapters 1 through 5 in Textbook Ethics for Life in preparation for the midterm exam
  • Review the Power Point presentation for chapters 1 through 5 located at "Course Content" area in preparation for the midterm exam.
  • To understand the relationship between morality and religion
  • To know the divine command theory and understand its implications
  • To understand natural law theory, as proposed by Thomas Aquinas, and how it differs from the divine command theory
  • To understand Henry David Thoreau's and Thomas Aquinas's views on civil disobedience as a moral imperative under natural law theory
  • To understand how religious views affect the concept of moral community
  • To know different philosophical and theological responses to the problem of God and the existence of evil and suffering in the world
  • To understand the difference between morality, spirituality, and religiosity
  • To understand morality's lack of dependence on religion

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 5," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch5" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 5.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Baby Theresa," read the description of her case, and based on what you have learned so far in this course, participate in an online discussion about the moral issues involved in Baby Teresa's case. See participation requirements for this discussion in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

 

  • Midterm Exam: Take a 40-multiple-choice / true or false question exam covering the material studied in chapters 1 through 5 of Ethics for Life. Please, contact Mr. Tyler Watts to take the exam.
    Points: 16.0

 

Total of points: 20.0

 

Remember: Midterm Exam - Chapters 1 through 5
Please contact Mr. Tyler Watts for information about how to take the Midterm Exam.

 

Weeks 5 & 6: Chapters 6-8

 

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 6:

 

Conscience and Moral Development

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 6 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 6 with special attention to the following topics:
    - Ethics and human development
    - Conscience: culturally relative or universal?
    - Affective and cognitive sides of conscience
    - The stage theory of moral development
    - The care perspective
    - The four components of moral behavior
    - Moral maturity: Moving beyond ethical relativism
  • Read the passage "The Philosophy of Moral Development," on page 211
  • Read the passage "In a Different Voice," on page 219
  • To know the different philosophical and scientific theories regarding the nature of conscience
  • To understand how environmental and biological factors and conscious moral direction work together in shaping or consciences
  • To understand the affective and the cognitive aspects of conscience and how the two work together
  • To know Lawrence Kohlberg's and Carol Gilligan's  stage theories of moral development and understand their views on the differences in moral reasoning between men and women
  • To know James Rest's four components of moral behavior: moral sensitivity, moral reasoning, moral motivation, and moral character
  • To understand the real-life implications of one's stage of moral development

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 6," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch6" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 6.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Moral Development" and submit a brief comment relating the concept of stages of moral development to the moral theories studied in the earlier chapters. Relate the stages and the theories to the actual behavior of people discussed in earlier chapters, such as Martin Luther King Jr., Adolph Eichmann, the subjects of Milgram's experiment, and the bystanders in the Kitty Genovese case. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

Total of points: 4.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 7:

 

Ethical Egoism: Morality as Our Best Self-Interest

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 7 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 7 with special attention to the following topics:
    - What is ethical egoism?
    - Psychological egoism
    - Ethical egoism and laissez-faire capitalism
    -Ethical egoism and the moral community
    - Self-interest and happiness
    - Critique of ethical egoism
  • Read the passage "Leviathan," on page 241
  • Read the passage "The Fountainhead," on page 249
  • To know the difference between ethical subjectivism, hedonism, and ethical egoism
  • To understand the distinction between ethical egoism and psychological egoism, as advocated by Thomas Hobbes
  • To know Ayn Rand's theory of rational egoism and understand how it supports a laissez-faire capitalist economic system
  • To understand the effect on the definition of moral community of accepting ethical egoism
  • To understand the relationship between happiness and pursuing our self-interests
  • To understand both the strengths and weaknesses of ethical egoism

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 7," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch7" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 7.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Ethical Egoism" and submit a brief comment about the following statement: Ethical egoism may be an unsatisfactory moral theory if it is taken on its own; however, it is an important corrective to an  ethics of self-sacrifice. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

Total of points:  4.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 8:

 

Utilitarianism: The Great Happiness Principle

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 8 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 8 with special attention to the following topics:
    - Utilitarianism and the principle of utility
    - Utilitarianism as universal love
    - Utilitarianism and social reform
    -Reformulation of utilitarianism by J. S. Mill
    - Utilitarianism and the moral community
    - Euthanasia and the principle of utility
  • Read the passage "An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation," on page 278
  • Read the passage "Utilitarianism," on page 287
  • To know the principle of utility, also known as the great happiness principle
  • To understand the distinction between rule-utilitarianism and act-utilitarianism
  • To understand utilitarianism as part of the Eastern moral philosophies
  • To know Mo Tzu and his philosophy of universal love
  • To know Jeremy Bentham and the role of his utilitarian theory in social policy and reform
  • To know how to apply the utilitarian calculus to real-life situations
  • To know John Stuart Mill and his reformulation of Bentham’s utilitarian theory regarding the quality of pleasures
  • To understand how the utilitarian definition of moral community includes all sentient beings
  • To understand the role of utilitarians, such as Peter Singer, in the animal liberation movement
  • To know how to apply utilitarian theory to a particular issue, such as euthanasia
  • To understand the strengths and weaknesses of utilitarianism

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 8," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch8" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 8.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Utilitarianism" and submit an example of a real-life moral situation showing the application of utilitarian principles found in your own experience or from newspapers, magazines, or movies. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

·         Go to "Review Exam 2": Take a 25-multiple- choice / true or false question exam covering the material studied in chapters 6, 7, and 8 of Ethics for Life. Please, make sure you read the exam's instructions thoroughly before taking the exam.
Points: 5.0

Total of points: 9.0

 

Remember: Exam 2 - Chapters 6, 7 and 8
Please, make sure you read the exam's instructions thoroughly before taking the exam.

 

Weeks 7 & 8: Chapters 9-11

 

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

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How Learning Will Be Assessed

Chapter 9:

 

Deontology: The Ethics of Duty

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 9 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 9 with special attention to the following topics:
    - Deontology and duty
    - Duty and community
    - The categorical imperative
    - The good will and proper self-esteem
    - Is the duty not to lie absolute?
    - Prima facie deontology

    - The duty of justice
    - Critique of deontology
  • Read the passage "The Analects of Confucius," on page 316
  • Read the passage "Fundamental Principles of the Methaphysic of Ethics," on page 321
  • To know the deontological theories and understand how they differ from cultural relativism, utilitarianism, and ethical egoism
  • To understand the distinction between absolute and prima facie moral duties, and between positive and negative moral duties
  • To know Confucian deontology and understand how it incorporates both virtue ethics and communitarian ethics
  • To know about Immanuel Kant, his formulation of the categorical imperative, and his concept of the good will
  • To understand the relationship between morality and the development of proper self-esteem
  • To know how to apply deontology theory to issues such as lying
  • To understand the difference between Kantian deontology and Ross’s prima facie deontology
  • To know Ross’s seven prima facie duties
  • To know John Rawls’s theory of justice as fairness
  • To understand the strengths and weaknesses of deontology

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 9," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch9" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 9.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Deontology" and submit an example of a real-life moral situation showing the application of deontological principles found in your own experience or from newspapers, magazines, or movies. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

·         Go to "Essay: My Ethical Legacy to the World" and submit a 1-page essay about your ethical legacy to the world. Essay should be based on the student’s thoughts about how his/her ethical life might bring a positive impact to the world. See submission requirements in D2L.
Points: 5.0

Total of points: 9.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 10:

 

Right Ethics: Morality is Based on Inalienable Human Rights

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 10 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 10 with special attention to the following topics:
    - The emergence of rights ethics
    - Natural rights ethics
    - The Marxist critique of natural rights ethics
    - Rights and duties
    - Buddhism and rights ethics
    - Liberty rights and welfare rights

    - Rights and the moral community
    - Critique of rights ethics
  • Read the passage "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights," on page 360
  • Read the passage "Two Treatises of Civil Government," on page 366
  • To understand the emergence of human rights ethics as a protest against the concept of divine rights
  • To know the expression of human rights ethics in historic movements and events
  • To know the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  • To understand the difference between moral and legal rights
  • To know the natural rights ethics of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Ayn Rand
  • To understand the ways in which natural rights ethics supports capitalism and libertarian political ideology
  • To understand why Marxists, including Karl Marx and liberation ethicist Gustavo Gutierrez, are critical of natural rights ethics
  • To understand the relation between rights and duties
  • To know the Catholic natural law concept of human rights
  • To understand the distinction between absolute and prima facie rights
  • To know the Buddhist approach to rights
  • To understand the distinction between liberty and welfare rights
  • To understand the relationship between concepts of rights and concepts of moral community
  • To know the distinction between basing rights on interests and basing rights on self-assertion

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 10," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch10" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 10.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Rights Ethics" and submit an example of a real-life moral situation showing the consequences of violation of rights ethics principles found in your own experience or from newspapers, magazines, or movies. See submission requirements for this assignment in D2L.
    Points: 2.0

Total of points: 4.0

  

Content Area

Learning Materials and Activities

Expected Learning Outcomes

How Learning Will Be Assessed

 

Chapter 11:

Virtue Ethics and the Good Life

 

 

Review of Chapters 6 Through 11 for the Final Exam

  • Power Point presentation for chapter 11 located at "Course Content" area
  • Textbook Ethics for Life
  • Read chapter 11 with special attention to the following topics:
    - Virtue ethics and character
    - Reason and virtue in Aristotle
    - The doctrine of the mean in Confucius and Aristotle
    - Sentiment and virtue in Nel Noddings and David Hume
    - Is virtue relative to culture, social status, and gender?
    - The unity of virtue
    -  Virtue and moral education
    - Critique of virtue ethics
  • Read the passage "Nicomachean Ethics," on page 407
  • Read the passage "Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education," on page 422

 

  • Review chapters 6 through 11 in the Textbook Ethics for Life in preparation for the final exam
  • Review the Power Point presentation for chapters 6 through 11 located at "Course Content" area in preparation for the final exam.
  • To know the definitions of virtue and vice
  • To understand the relationship between virtue ethics and character
  • To know theories regarding how we can best cultivate the good will or a virtuous character
  • To understand the relationship between virtue, happiness, and human nature
  • To understand the role of intention in virtue
  • To know Aristotle’s and Confucius’s doctrine of the mean
  • To know Nel Noddings’s and David Hume’s theories regarding the importance of sentiment in virtue
  • To understand how culture and gender influence our views of what constitutes a virtue
  • To understand Aristotle’s concept of unity of virtue
  • To understand the importance of moral education in cultivating a virtuous character

In the course homepage, go to "Chapter 11," then:

  • Go to "Review Quiz Ch11" and complete a mandatory quiz about Ethics for Life: Chapter 11.
    Points: 2.0
  • Go to "Mercy Killing," read the description of Tracy Latimer's  case, and based on what you have learned from chapter 6 to chapter 11, participate in an online discussion about the moral issues involved in Tracy's case. See participation requirements for this discussion in D2L
    Points: 2.0

 

  • Final Exam: Take a 40-multiple-choice / true or false question exam covering the material studied in chapters 6 through 11 of Ethics for Life. Please, contact Mr. Tyler Watts to take the exam.
    Points: 16.0

Total of points: 20.0

 

Remember: Final Exam - Chapters 6 through 11
Please contact Mr. Tyler Watts for information about how to take the Final Exam.

Note:
The activities and expected learning outcomes described above were taken from the course's textbook, Ethics for Life: A Text with Readings, 4th Edition, written by Judith Boss, and published by McGraw-Hill in 2008 and its accompanying Instructor's Manual; and The Elements of Moral Philosophy, written by James Rachels, and published by McGraw-Hill, in 2007.

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Grading & Exam Policy

  • Submission Deadlines and Due Dates
    • To complete this course successfully students are required to do the following mandatory tasks:
      1. Take 12 online quizzes (2 points each) by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. These quizzes can be taken from any computer with access to the Internet. After the deadline the quiz will be unavailable and the student will not receive credit for that specific quiz.
      2. Send 1 email (1 point) during the first week of class by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. After the deadline the student will not receive credit for this activity.
      3. Post 1 online introduction (1 point) during the first week of class by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. After the deadline the student will not receive credit for this activity.
      4. Post 9 online postings (2 points each) by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. After the deadline the posting will be unavailable and the student will not receive credit for that specific activity.
      5. Participate in 2 online discussions (2 points each) by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. Students must participate in these discussions. After the deadline the discussion will be unavailable and the student will not receive credit for that specific activity.
      6. Take 2 online review exams (5 points each) by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. These exams can be taken from any computer with access to the Internet. After the deadline the exam will be unavailable and the student will not receive credit for that specific exam.
      7. Submit 2 online essays (5 points each) by the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. After the deadline the essay will be unavailable and the student will not receive credit for that specific essay.
      8. Take 1 online midterm exam (16 points) on the date indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. This exam must be taken online, (please contact Mr. Tyler Watts for information about how to take the exam) during the dates indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above, neither before nor after. There is no make-up for the midterm exam. Students who miss the midterm exam will not receive credit for the exam. Missing of the exam due to extraordinary circumstances (death in the immediate family, natural disaster, student illness, etc.) will be considered, at sole discretion of the instructor, in a case-by-case basis.
      9. Take 1 online final exam (16 points) on the date indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. This exam must be taken online (please contact Mr. Tyler Watts for information about how to take the exam) during the dates indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above, neither before nor after. There is no make-up for the final exam. Students who miss the final exam will not receive credit for the exam. Missing of the exam due to extraordinary circumstances (death in the immediate family, natural disaster, student illness, etc.) will be considered, at sole discretion of the instructor, in a case-by-case basis.
    • Note that in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above, most of the tasks have a “Deadline,” which means that students can submit or complete that task before (if available to the students) or on that date. However, two tasks, the midterm exam and the final exam, don’t have a deadline; they have dates, which means that they have to be taken on those dates, neither before nor after.
  • Late submissions
    • The submission time for all online assignment (except for the midterm and final exams, which will comply with Mr. Tyler Watts’s instructions) is 11:59 PM of the deadline indicated in the “Class Schedule and Assignments” section above. Assignments submitted after the due date and time will not be accepted.
    • Quizzes cannot be completed after the due date and time. Allow ample time to complete quizzes. For the midterm and final exams see Mr. Tyler Watts for instructions for your test. If you arrive late, you may not have sufficient time to complete the exam.
    • There will be no make-up available for online assignments. Additionally, there will be no make-up for midterm and final exams. Students who miss either of the exams, without just cause, will not receive credit for it. However, the missing of the exam due to extraordinary circumstances (death in the immediate family, natural disaster, student illness, etc.) will be considered, at sole discretion of the instructor, in a case-by-case basis.
  • On-Campus Exams
    • This course requires the completion of two proctored, on-campus exams.
    • Exams may be taken any time on the dates indicated. Exams will not be administered after the dates and times indicated in the syllabus, unless there are extenuating circumstances and you have made prior arrangements with the instructor.
    • Before taking your exams, see Mr. Tyler Watts to receive instructions about how to take the exam. Allow plenty of time to complete your test. Tests must be submitted whether they have been completed or not. You will not be able to return to complete the test at a later date.
    • You will need to show a VATC identification card or picture ID in order to be able to take the test.
    • On-campus tests will be delivered online via D2L in a multiple choice format.
    • The use of notes, books, binder, texts, etc. is not permitted for any test
  • Make-up Exam Policy
    • Make-up exams will be permitted, solely at the discretion of the instructor, only under extenuating circumstances and only with prior notification and documentation (original funeral notice, original doctor note, etc.).
    • The instructor reserves the right to create alternate make-up exams for students who are not able to take the scheduled, on campus exams.
    • Exams cannot be made up after the exam date has passed unless prior arrangements have been made.
  • D2L-Based Quizzes
    • These quizzes can be taken any time prior to the closing date, and may be taken via any computer with an Internet connection.
    • Collaboration between students and discussion of quiz answers are not permitted.
    • You will be able to attempt each quiz twice. Allow time to complete each quiz before the closing date and time. Make sure you have a solid Internet connection. If your ISP disconnects you during a quiz, that will count as an attempt and you will not be able to repeat the quiz if that is your second attempt.
  • View Your Grades
    • Online quiz and exam grades will be available after finishing the quiz or exam. View "My Grades" from the course homepage.
    • Grades for assignments will be posted within seven BC working days of the closing date of the assignment.
    • Grades for discussion postings will be posted seven days after the discussion has closed.
    • Final grades for the course will be posted at BC Web Site within a week after final exams are taken.
  • How your grade will be determined:
    • Students grades will be determined as follow:

Assessment

Graded Points

Percent of Final Grade

Quizzes (12 x 2.0 pts)

24.0

24%

Orientation Email (1 x 1.0 pt)

1.0

1%

Orientation Posting (1 x 1.0 pt)

1.0

1%

Online Postings (9 x 2.0 pts)

18.0

18%

Online Discussion (2 x 2.0 pts)

4.0

4%

Review Exams (2 x 5.0 pts)

10.0

10%

Essays (2 x 5.0 pts)

10.0

10%

Midterm

16.0

16%

Final

16.0

16%

Totals

100.0

100%

     

Grading Scale

Grades

Percentage

Grade = A

90-100%

Grade = B

80-89%

Grade = C

70-79%

Grade = D

60-69%

Grade = F

59% and below

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Communication Policy

  • Expectations for Course Communication
    • BC Email: Please do not send course related emails to the instructor's BC email address. Use the D2L email address instead. Assignments sent to the instructor's BC email address will not be accepted. Send your assignments to the instructor via D2L using the D2L feature identified in the syllabus.
    • D2L Email: Use the email tool only for private, personal, one to one communication with a specific individual or groups of individuals.
    • Discussions: Please check the discussion area regularly. Use the class discussion tool to post questions that might be of general interest to all students such as questions about assignments, tests, etc. Feel free to respond to other students if you think you can help them. Remember - we are all in this together and we can learn from each other. Remember that the discussion tool is public - everyone will be able to view posts and responses.
    • Chat Rooms: Chat Rooms allow you to talk with other students in the course in real-time outside of your on-campus class meetings. Students must setup times at which to meet other students in the chat room. This is a useful tool for coordinating group projects.
    • Netiquette: In all online communication, it is expected that all students will follow rules of online "netiquette". Netiquette is a set of rules for polite online behavior that all members of this class is expected to follow. See details at http://www.albion.com/netiquette/index.html) Basically, these rules say "be respectful and be polite to each other". and "be patient and considerate of others". No one is perfect and we all have different approaches to life, work, and school.
      • Individuals who violate the netiquette policy or engage in disruptive online behaviors such as flaming (posting disrespectful or hostile comments), posting inappropriate comments, or shouting (posting messages using all capitals) may have their course access privileges revoked and/or they may be referred to the Student Dean. Students who continue to engage in unacceptable online behavior even after being warned, may be permanently denied access to the course and/or may receive an F for the course.
      • Please don't use email short hand like ROTFLO (rolling on the floor laughing outloud) or BTW (by the way) - not everyone knows what these abbreviations mean.
      • Remember that in the real world we can see the facial expressions, gestures, and hear tone of voice. We can't do that online so it's very easy to misinterpret another person's meaning to to be misinterpreted ourselves. Be careful of how you communicate to your instructor and to your peers online. If you want to use emoticons (smileys) to convey feelings, please stick with the basics happy :-) sad :-( or wink ;-) Others are less well known and are subject to different interpretations. The idea is to be clear in your communications.
      • If you have a concern about the course, a test or an assignment, please contact the instructor.
  • Privacy Notice
    • D2L software automatically stores course access records, quiz scores, email postings, discussion postings, and chatroom conversations. One more reason to make sure that your communications adhere to the netiquette policy.
  • Alternate Communication
    • In the unlikely event that a D2L problem makes it impossible to use the course communication tools for more than 24 hours, the instructor will communicate with students (if necessary) via their BC email addresses. Access your BC email account here: http://www.broward.edu/info/studentemail/Home.jsp
  • Faculty Response Policy
    • Course emails and discussion posts will be answered within 48 hours. Emails sent on Saturday or Sunday may not be answered until Monday. It is recommend that you post course related questions in the discussion area. If you need info related to a test or assignment, plan ahead and submit your questions well ahead of the due date. Your instructor is not online 24 hours per day, please allow time for response.

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Assorted Policies and Procedures

  • Special Needs: Students having special needs as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act should:
    • Notify the Office of Disability Services as early in the term as possible. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Disability Support Office prior to document disability prior to receiving services.
    • Notify the instructor after you have contacted the Office of Disability Services so that the instructor can consult with the Office of Disability Services to discuss what reasonable accommodations would be appropriate for your situation.
  • Academic Honesty (Cheating):
    • Each student's academic work must be the result of his or her own thought, research, or self-expression.
    • Cheating includes, but is not limited to: copying the work of another person (plagiarism) or permitting your work to be copied by another person, discussing test answers or questions with people who have not completed the test, distributing assignment materials to other students, poses sing course materials that have not been formally released to students in the course, and collaborating on the completion of assignments not specifically designated in the syllabus as being "group projects".
    • Cheating will be considered a breach of Broward Community College's Code of Conduct Policy and may result in academic penalties (zero points on the assignment/test in question, a failing grade for the course), disciplinary action, and/or a referral to the Dean of Student Affairs.
      Examples:
      1) If it appears that two or more students have submitted the same material for any solo assignments, each student involved will receive zero points for that assignment.
      2) If it appears that a student has copied an assignment from published material (including Internet sites), the student will receive an zero points for that assignment
  • Critical Event Procedure
    • In the event of a school closing due to weather or other major event that might impact class schedules, the instructor will post an announcement indicating what changes (if any), the event will have on the course schedule and due dates.
  • Copyright
    • Please add the following statement relating to copyright to your syllabus and as a lower textblock on the course homepage.
      • The materials used on this course Web site may be protected by copyright and are only for the use of students enrolled in this course for the purposes associated with this course and may not be retained or further disseminated
  • Withdrawals
    • No withdrawals will be given for any reason. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw from this class by the withdrawal deadline if you are not earning the grade you want or will not be able to complete the course. To view important dates (including withdrawal deadlines) for this semester, visit the college calendar on line.
  • Logging Off D2L
    • D2L does not require you to log off to exit D2L. Security Warning: If you don't close your browser or log off, a person using that machine after you will have access to your course materials, could send e-mail to me in your name, and view your confidential student record. Protect your password.
  • Changes to the Syllabus
    • The instructor reserves the right to make changes to this syllabus. In the event that changes become necessary, students will be notified through D2L Announcement/Email.

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Student Success Tips

Success Tips are located in the Student Handbook. It is recommended that you familiarize yourself with the various ways that you can increase your chances of being successful in this course.

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